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Dani 4-24-15-Iora-Health-Employee-Portraits-0057 3

A part of something bigger

What led me here to Iora? That’s an interesting question. Healthcare was never interesting to me. I went to school for filmmaking and the only real thoughts I had of the health system was that it was expensive. I avoided doctors and hospitals like the plague. Being healthy, I could get away with that.

Then, life changed. I met my husband, a type 1 diabetic, and about nine months later, my video editing job came to an end. After several months of hard thought I realized that while I was pretty good at filmmaking, it wasn’t the right place for me. Not knowing what was, I took a job doing accounts receivable at a Skilled Nursing Facility.

Work was disheartening. I watched families struggle to try and figure out how to pay for rehab and long term care. I called 85 year old widows on social security to tell them they owed money for their time with us while they were trying to figure out how they were going to pay to heat their house that winter. And the worst was the sad realization that the work wasn’t about what was right for the patients, but rather what was best for the facility.

And it was just as disheartening on the personal side. There was a lack of communication between my husband’s doctors. We had little to no support in general, especially when we had to figure out how to do what the doctors prescribed. While his primary care doctor was better than most, she didn’t have the time to spend with him or with his specialists that would have been truly beneficial. We felt like numbers, not names and certainly not people.

We are told from a young age that we can do anything we put our minds to; that we can change the world. But on so many levels, at work and at home, it felt like I was constantly swimming upstream, with someone telling me why we couldn’t do something, why some change or another wouldn’t work. Just three years out of school and I had stopped believing that change was possible.

The spring after we got married, I started looking for a new job. I stumbled across an administrative/finance position at Iora Health. While I had no interest in continuing in healthcare, I needed to pay my bills. Honestly, I didn’t expect much, but when I read the company description, I felt an immediate connection. You could feel the honesty in it. These people believed they could change things.

I applied for the job knowing that I could do about half of what they were looking for, and that I could learn the rest if someone was willing to teach me. I never expected that I would actually get a call, but the next day I received an email asking for a phone screen. After talking to Paul Dufault for a half hour, I was hooked. I dug up everything I could on Iora (which wasn’t much beyond the The New Yorker’s “The Hot Spotters” article), and the more I read, the more excited I got. As the interview process progressed, I realized that I wanted this job more than I’d ever wanted any job. What they were doing made so much sense to me. I never thought about the fact that it was a start up or that in six months I may not have a job, or that they could fail. It didn’t matter to me; I wanted to be a part of this.

When Iora’s Chief Operating Officer, Zander Packard, told me that they wanted to hire me but they weren’t sure when they could bring me on, I told him I would wait. We set up a time to check in in a few weeks. That was in March of 2012 and I started in May and haven’t looked back since.

The past three years have been an incredible journey. I’ve watched the company grow from 30 people with two practices in two states, to 150+ people with 12 practices in seven states. I’ve grow in leaps and bounds as my role evolves. I’ve done everything from ordering lunch and scheduling meetings, to writing company policies and creating processes. I found a company that believes that if you do the right thing, the rest of the pieces will fall into place. The bottom line is important, but it’s not the first thing.

Margaret Mead once said “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” I never felt that this was a truer statement than I have working with this amazing group of people at Iora Health.

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